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Author Topic: spanish lady  (Read 8228 times)
beachclubber1952
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« on: April 19, 2009, 12:51PM »

in the song spanish lady,my daughter wants to know what doe "one for the tura lura lady" mean? i know the same sort of verse is in "irish lullaby".
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MaryNorth93
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2009, 04:00PM »

As far as I know it does not mean anything...

I do not really like the song. It isn't a story for me, they've skipped more couplets and the refrain, what doesn't mean anything is repeated the whole time... Huh By At the Ceili is that much more clear, that it is a story Smiley
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Celtic Lass
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2009, 10:06AM »

That phrase is just mouth music. Dosen't mean a thing!
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raven_christina
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« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2009, 10:43AM »

...the song isn't about Spanish Influenza. Just so everybody knows. -snickers-  Roll Eyes
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Marissa
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« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2009, 09:29AM »

I have figured the chorus to be

"Whack for the toora lora laddy,
Whack for the toora lora lay;
Whack for the toora lora laddy,
Whack for the toora lora lay!"

I've got absolutely any idea if any of it is correct, but it is jsut knida catchy, LOL
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« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2009, 12:59PM »

bottom line is that...


SPANISH LADY IS A GREAT SONG!!
 Grin
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irishtiger
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« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2009, 06:26PM »

As far as I know there is no true translation to toora loora. It is simply a lullaby baby talk you sing to a child to get them to go to sleep. Being Irish it was a song my Dad used to sing to me.

Irishtiger  Cheesy
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irishtiger
celticheart18
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« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2009, 08:36PM »

it just adds flair to an already brilliant song! and yes it is Whack for the toora loora laddy whack for the toora loora lay...so on and so forth
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Kevin R.I.
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« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2009, 10:59AM »

Okay, I asked my 81 year old neighbor(born and brought up in Dublin and lived there the first half of her life. )Here`s her take. "Toora Loora "is indeed just a lullaby(as she said with one of her "Irishism`s,"   "I haven`t heard that used in Donkey`s Years"). Whack for the toora loora laddy translates to "scold the little boy" using a rosewood cane that naturally grows in Ireland and is often used as a cane or walking stick(it`s got a knarled  and thorney  finish),OUCH!
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beachclubber1952
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« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2009, 03:51PM »

thanks,makes sense to me
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Bluefire
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« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2009, 03:58PM »

Okay, I asked my 81 year old neighbor(born and brought up in Dublin and lived there the first half of her life. )Here`s her take. "Toora Loora "is indeed just a lullaby(as she said with one of her "Irishism`s,"   "I haven`t heard that used in Donkey`s Years"). Whack for the toora loora laddy translates to "scold the little boy" using a rosewood cane that naturally grows in Ireland and is often used as a cane or walking stick(it`s got a knarled  and thorney  finish),OUCH!

*laugh*  Nice.  I was going to say it reminded me a bit of the Disney song "Oo De Lally", but yeah.   Grin
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celticatheart
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« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2009, 04:43PM »

In The High Kings dvd concert Darren includes it as one of the traditional Irish choruses, like the tiddly i in The Beggerman. That's what I took it to be simple mouth music/traditional chorus.

Sarah
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howard
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« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2009, 05:42PM »

I have figured the chorus to be

"Whack for the toora lora laddy,
Whack for the toora lora lay;
Whack for the toora lora laddy,
Whack for the toora lora lay!"

I've got absolutely any idea if any of it is correct, but it is jsut knida catchy, LOL

Hi Marissa,
That's very good...
I call it Celtic "Doo-Wop"...
 Roll Eyes  Cheesy  Wink
Howard
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beachclubber1952
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« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2009, 05:58AM »

just listening to an old 80s song, come on eileen by dexys midnight ramblers and lo and behold they use the phrase"'tura lura".
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Parker Gabriel
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« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2014, 10:01PM »



The refrain of “Spanish Lady,” which reads “Whack for the toora loora laddy / Whack for the toora loora lay / Whack for the toora loora laddy / Whack for the toora loora lay,” is an example of lilting. The verses give all the information the listener needs.

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